Difference between revisions of "Nufoɔ kokoran"

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Enema etumi de nufo kokoram ba no bi ye nna, kese,obi a o.<ref name="NCI2014Pt">{{cite web|title=Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)|url=http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/breast/Patient/page1/AllPages|website=NCI|accessdate=29 June 2014|date=23 May 2014}}</ref>
 
<!--The balance of benefits versus harms of breast cancer screening is controversial. A 2013 Cochrane review stated that it is unclear if mammographic screening does more good or harm.<ref name="Got2013">{{cite journal|vauthors=Gøtzsche PC, Jørgensen KJ|title=Screening for breast cancer with mammography.|journal=The Cochrane database of systematic reviews|volume=6|pages=CD001877|date=4 June 2013|pmid=23737396|doi=10.1002/14651858.CD001877.pub5}}</ref> A 2009 review for the US Preventive Services Task Force found evidence of benefit in those 40 to 70 years of age,<ref>{{cite journal|last1=Nelson|first1=HD|last2=Tyne|first2=K|last3=Naik|first3=A|last4=Bougatsos|first4=C|last5=Chan|first5=B|last6=Nygren|first6=P|last7=Humphrey|first7=L|title=Screening for Breast Cancer: Systematic Evidence Review Update for the US Preventive Services Task Force [Internet].|date=November 2009|pmid=20722173}}</ref> and the organization recommends screening every two years in women 50 to 74 years old.<ref name="USPSTFScreen2016">{{cite journal|last1=Siu|first1=Albert L.|title=Screening for Breast Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement|journal=Annals of Internal Medicine|date=12 January 2016|doi=10.7326/M15-2886}}</ref> The medications tamoxifen or raloxifene may be used in an effort to prevent breast cancer in those who are at high risk of developing it.<ref name="WCR2014">{{cite book|title=World Cancer Report 2014|date=2014|publisher=World Health Organization|isbn=92-832-0429-8|pages=Chapter 5.2}}</ref> Surgical removal of both breasts is another preventative measure in some high risk women.<ref name="WCR2014">{{cite book|title=World Cancer Report 2014|date=2014|publisher=World Health Organization|isbn=92-832-0429-8|pages=Chapter 5.2}}</ref> In those who have been diagnosed with cancer, a number of treatments may be used, including surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and targeted therapy.<ref name="NCI2014Pt">{{cite web|title=Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)|url=http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/breast/Patient/page1/AllPages|website=NCI|accessdate=29 June 2014|date=23 May 2014}}</ref> Types of surgery vary from breast-conserving surgery to mastectomy.<ref name="ACSfive">{{Citation|author1=American College of Surgeons|author1-link=American College of Surgeons|date=September 2013|title=Five Things Physicians and Patients Should Question|publisher=American College of Surgeons|work=[[Choosing Wisely]]: an initiative of the [[ABIM Foundation]]|page=|url=http://www.choosingwisely.org/doctor-patient-lists/american-college-of-surgeons/|accessdate=2 January 2013}}</ref><ref name="NCI2014TxProf">{{cite web|title=Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)|url=http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/breast/healthprofessional/page1/AllPages|website=NCI|accessdate=29 June 2014|date=26 June 2014}}</ref> Breast reconstruction may take place at the time of surgery or at a later date. In those in whom the cancer has spread to other parts of the body, treatments are mostly aimed at improving quality of life and comfort.<ref name="NCI2014TxProf">{{cite web|title=Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)|url=http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/breast/healthprofessional/page1/AllPages|website=NCI|accessdate=29 June 2014|date=26 June 2014}}</ref>
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