Difference between revisions of "Nufoɔ kokoran"

Hidding text in English waiting for translation
(Created by translating the page "Breast cancer")
 
(Hidding text in English waiting for translation)
Enema etumi de nufo kokoram ba no bi ye nna, kese,obi a o.<ref name="NCI2014Pt">{{cite web|title=Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)|url=http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/breast/Patient/page1/AllPages|website=NCI|accessdate=29 June 2014|date=23 May 2014}}</ref>
 
<!--The balance of benefits versus harms of breast cancer screening is controversial. A 2013 Cochrane review stated that it is unclear if mammographic screening does more good or harm.<ref name="Got2013">{{cite journal|vauthors=Gøtzsche PC, Jørgensen KJ|title=Screening for breast cancer with mammography.|journal=The Cochrane database of systematic reviews|volume=6|pages=CD001877|date=4 June 2013|pmid=23737396|doi=10.1002/14651858.CD001877.pub5}}</ref> A 2009 review for the US Preventive Services Task Force found evidence of benefit in those 40 to 70 years of age,<ref>{{cite journal|last1=Nelson|first1=HD|last2=Tyne|first2=K|last3=Naik|first3=A|last4=Bougatsos|first4=C|last5=Chan|first5=B|last6=Nygren|first6=P|last7=Humphrey|first7=L|title=Screening for Breast Cancer: Systematic Evidence Review Update for the US Preventive Services Task Force [Internet].|date=November 2009|pmid=20722173}}</ref> and the organization recommends screening every two years in women 50 to 74 years old.<ref name="USPSTFScreen2016">{{cite journal|last1=Siu|first1=Albert L.|title=Screening for Breast Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement|journal=Annals of Internal Medicine|date=12 January 2016|doi=10.7326/M15-2886}}</ref> The medications tamoxifen or raloxifene may be used in an effort to prevent breast cancer in those who are at high risk of developing it.<ref name="WCR2014">{{cite book|title=World Cancer Report 2014|date=2014|publisher=World Health Organization|isbn=92-832-0429-8|pages=Chapter 5.2}}</ref> Surgical removal of both breasts is another preventative measure in some high risk women.<ref name="WCR2014">{{cite book|title=World Cancer Report 2014|date=2014|publisher=World Health Organization|isbn=92-832-0429-8|pages=Chapter 5.2}}</ref> In those who have been diagnosed with cancer, a number of treatments may be used, including surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and targeted therapy.<ref name="NCI2014Pt">{{cite web|title=Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)|url=http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/breast/Patient/page1/AllPages|website=NCI|accessdate=29 June 2014|date=23 May 2014}}</ref> Types of surgery vary from breast-conserving surgery to mastectomy.<ref name="ACSfive">{{Citation|author1=American College of Surgeons|author1-link=American College of Surgeons|date=September 2013|title=Five Things Physicians and Patients Should Question|publisher=American College of Surgeons|work=[[Choosing Wisely]]: an initiative of the [[ABIM Foundation]]|page=|url=http://www.choosingwisely.org/doctor-patient-lists/american-college-of-surgeons/|accessdate=2 January 2013}}</ref><ref name="NCI2014TxProf">{{cite web|title=Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)|url=http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/breast/healthprofessional/page1/AllPages|website=NCI|accessdate=29 June 2014|date=26 June 2014}}</ref> Breast reconstruction may take place at the time of surgery or at a later date. In those in whom the cancer has spread to other parts of the body, treatments are mostly aimed at improving quality of life and comfort.<ref name="NCI2014TxProf">{{cite web|title=Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)|url=http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/breast/healthprofessional/page1/AllPages|website=NCI|accessdate=29 June 2014|date=26 June 2014}}</ref>{{Reflist|30em}}
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